author, historian & phd candidate

Author: Tara Calaby Page 1 of 6

Extinction Notice

I have a short story, “Earth-seed” in the new cli-fi anthology Extinction Notice: Tales of a Warming Earth. It’s a huge collection of stories, poetry and songs, and all profits will be donated to environmental charities, so I encourage you to check it out at http://outskirtspress.com/davidwatson!

TV: Lynda Day (Press Gang)

Always a little behind the times, I took around three decades to get around to watching “Press Gang”, despite owning the DVD collection for two of those decades. I thought I’d probably left it too late, as 80s and 90s teen TV has generally aged poorly, but I ended up being pleasantly surprised. Sure, the fashion is a bit iffy, but the soul of the series holds up well even today.

I wish I’d watched “Press Gang” back in the day because I really could’ve used having a character like Lynda to see myself in. Like me, she’s ambitious, driven, goal-focused… and absolutely rubbish at people. It’s not that she doesn’t have a good heart, but rather that emotions are a confusing and irritating distraction from more important things—especially when those emotions are her own. Her single-mindedness makes her an excellent editor, but it’s at the expense of human relationships, something that she touches upon occasionally but never in any real depth. She has Kenny, her ever-patient best friend and assistant editor, and Gazette head-writer Sarah, but they both leave her eventually, and that comes as no surprise.

At the beginning of her friendship with Sarah, Lynda says that everyone leaves her, as a way to manipulate Sarah, but it’s a manipulation based on truth. Lynda is too much for most people to handle. She’s hard work, she’s abrasive, and she is quite terrible at offering the comfort and understanding that most people want from a friend. To be fair, she doesn’t expect to receive that kind of care, either. Lynda might be difficult, but she’s rarely a hypocrite. She does what she thinks is the right thing to do, and she’s loyal to the people she cares for, even if they can’t see that, obscured as it is by her harsh tongue and abrasive ways.

And then, of course, there’s Spike, Lynda’s on-off boyfriend. He wants Lynda from the moment he meets her, but she takes a while to warm to him, and even longer to admit that she has feelings for him as well. “Press Gang” is partially the story of the push-pull relationship between Lynda and Spike and, while the later series don’t quite maintain the antagonistic chemistry of the show’s beginning, there is still the feeling that Lynda needs to be with someone like Spike, who will call her out when she behaves badly, but still love her for who she is, instead of despite of it.

Importantly, “Press Gang” never punishes Lynda for being a strong-minded woman who puts her work before her emotions. It’s not that Lynda never suffers negative consequences of her actions, but rather that bad things don’t happen to her simply because of the person she is. If anything, the powerful people in her life are too accepting, too willing to uplift her as a young woman of exceptional talent. I’m more than happy to overlook a little lack of realism on that count, though, as I would far prefer young female media consumers were offered too much hope for future success rather than too little.

Lynda’s a great character because she remains herself throughout the entirety of “Press Gang”. There’s no softening, no adoption of a more palatable kind of femininity, and I wish there had been a lot more Lynda’s to be found in my childhood media consumption, instead of an endless parade of girls casting off their tomboy personalities the moment that puberty began.

REVIEW: Kung Fu Panda (Xbox 360)

Kung Fu Panda Xbox 360 Cover

When I bought my Xbox 360, many years ago now, it came with three free games: Saint’s Row, Lego Indiana Jones, and Kung Fu Panda. Apparently they wanted to appeal to both the family market and the white-people-who-enjoy-games-full-of-the-N-word market. I tried Saint’s Row a while back and DNFed it pretty quickly. I was expecting Kung Fu Panda to be a speedy DNF as well. I’ve never seen the movie it’s based on, and my recent experiences in dealing with my game backlog have taught me that movie tie-in games are rarely any good.

This one, though? It’s really not bad! It’s extremely short and not exactly challenging, but I don’t necessarily think that’s such a terrible thing for a game that’s largely aimed at kids. I had a major case of pandemic brain when playing it, and it felt like the ideal game to pick up in that kind of situation—when you want something to occupy you but not to be taxing in any real way. I picture myself replaying it in the future when I’m stuck on the couch with a bad head cold.

As I said, this is not a long game. I finished it in around five hours of game play, and that’s with getting the 100% achievements for most of the levels. In the single player campaign, there aren’t many options for extending the length; the action is generally very railroaded, so it’s not like you can head off and explore for hours on end. There’s a reasonable amount of variety for the short length, however. You mostly play as Po, but there are also sections where you take control of other characters, who have different skill sets. Shifu, for example, has a cloud jumping ability, which is fun until you forget to hit the jump button and go crashing to your doom. A less successful game play element involves pressing specific buttons within a short time frame in order to execute fancy moves. I’m never a huge fan of that, but I’m even less of a fan when it happens with no warning in the middle of a seemingly normal fight.

On the whole, the cameras and controls were good for a game of this age. It allowed me to change the camera controls to the modern directions, but there was no way to alter the vertical movement in the one brief flying scene, which was unfortunate for both me as a player and for the characters I kept crashing into lightning bolts in consequence.

The voice acting might feel a bit strange to a player familiar with the film cast, but for me it generally worked quite well. Visually, it was good for a game of its age, which is probably helped by the lack of human characters.

All-up, Kung Fu Panda proved to be one of the pleasant surprises of my backlog adventure. It’s a solid family-oriented game with a mix of platforming and fighting elements that are entertaining in a non-demanding way.

REVIEW: Halo 2: Anniversary

Halo 2 Anniversary cover

I came to the Halo franchise very late. I played the original game for the first time nearly two decades after its release, and now the sequel sixteen years after it came out in 2004. The advantage of leaving it so long is that my introduction has been through the updated anniversary editions that form part of the Master Chief Collection that was released for the Xbox One.

I was absolutely not a player of shooters until I met Bioware. Prior to picking up the first Mass Effect game, the only FPS I’d played was the admittedly great-for-the-time N64 Goldeneye game. One of the things I’ve come to terms with over the last year is that my taste in games has changed greatly from when I got my first console a little under two decades ago. I used to be big on platforming (weren’t we all?) and couldn’t stand first-person shooters. I didn’t really like ranged attacks at all. Now, however, platformers feel like a chore, and not a bearable one – think scrubbing the shower grouting, rather than taking the recycling out. Shooters, though, have become much more enjoyable to me, and the Halo games have been my introduction to the straightforward kind of FPS, as opposed to the heightened atmosphere and coolness of the Bioshock games.

While I like shooters now, I still don’t fall into the true target audience of the Halo games. There’s a definite sense in the first two games that we’re meant to use the characterless Master Chief as an avatar for our own hero fantasies, and my hero fantasies have never involved being a dude with no personality who goes around shooting aliens. (As a comparison—and me being me, of course it’s a Dragon Age 2 comparison—I would give almost anything to be as cool as Garrett Hawke.) I wish there was an opportunity to either learn more about who the Master Chief is, or else to define that for yourself. Because of this, I really appreciated the introduction of the Arbiter as a playable character in Halo 2. While I struggled with some gameplay aspects connected to this (from a distance, there’s no way of knowing who’s an enemy and who’s an ally), the Arbiter is definitely a more interesting protagonist than the faceless Master Chief.

As far as the other characters go, well, the storyline is a little cumbersome at times, but both Miranda Keyes and Johnson are likeable and well-portrayed by their voice actors, Julie Benz and David Scully. (Keith David does a good job as the Arbiter as well.) In the Anniversary edition, all of the characters look great, too. The humans are quite realistic (and Miranda actually looks like a commander instead of a cam girl) and all of the aliens have benefited from their HD glow-up. The scenery looks much prettier, too, although switching between the original and remastered versions reveals that sometimes this comes at the expense of atmosphere. The improved sound is excellent, demonstrated particularly well when the soundtrack heightens during several of the mass fight scenes.

I had two key issues with Halo 2. The first is quite straightforward: it’s very repetitive. If the game were as long as many modern games are, I would have struggled to finish it without pausing to play something else in between Halo sessions. Generally, a mission involves moving through an area filled with enemies and either killing all those enemies or else getting past them without being killed yourself. Obviously, that’s the basic outline of many games, but I don’t think Halo really goes beyond that outline. The cutscenes are mostly just at the beginning and end of each mission, and there’s not a lot of real variation between one mission and the next.

The second key problem is that it’s not always clear where you need to go and what you need to do. This game would benefit so much from a map function, or at least some kind of indicator on the radar of where you’re supposed to head next. A lot of my game time was spent wandering in circles trying to find a way out of a particular area. There’s also the fact that it’s a rare thing for the game to indicate whether you’re in a kill-everything area or a these-things-will-respawn-until-eternity area. For people who are playing for the sheer enjoyment of shooting stuff, this probably isn’t a big issue, but I’m more goal-driven in games, and I’d have really appreciated knowing when I could move on without going full Armageddon on everything first.

I personally enjoy gaming as a solitary pursuit, so I can’t speak at all about the multiplayer maps or experience in Halo 2. I do, however, appreciate that a game that has such a focus on the multiplayer aspect also has a strong single player campaign mode.

All up, I am enjoying finally getting to experience such an important gaming franchise, and I think it’s been a good primer on FPS gaming for me. I think a lot of my criticisms of both this game and the original relate a lot to who I am as a gamer, rather than to the quality of the game as a whole. And, ultimately, none of them stopped me playing, nor enjoying, Halo 2—they just meant that it won’t ever be a favourite, and that’s fine. I have enough games I play once a year as it is.

The Ghost of You

Black Telephone magazine

A slightly belated announcement that the second issue of Black Telephone Magazine has launched, containing my piece “The Ghost of You”—a dark sci-fi piece about love and loss, with a fantasy aesthetic.

You can find my piece here, but please check out the rest of the great content as well!

Within These Walls

Another writing announcement!

My piece “Within These Walls” is now available to read for free at
Daily Science Fiction. Hope you like it.

Three Days with the Kid

Another writing announcement! My piece “Three Days with the Kid” has just been published as part of Strange Horizons‘s climate crisis special.

You can read the piece online, or listen to it on the podcast.

Make sure you check out the gorgeous art by Dante Luiz while you’re there!

Plucked

A very belated update! I am pleased to announce that my piece “Plucked” was published in January. “Plucked” is a new, feminist fairy tale, and it has found the perfect home at Corvid Queen, which focuses on mythology, folk lore and fairy tales, all with a deliciously feminist bent.

You can read “Plucked” online if it sounds like your kind of thing!

On Clockwork Wings

I’m pleased to be able to announce that my piece “On Clockwork Wings” has just been published in the current issue of Galaxy’s Edge. I’m particularly excited to have my writing alongside that of such speculative fiction greats as Mercedes Lackey and Robert Silverberg and all the other excellent authors featured in this issue. You can currently read my story online at http://www.galaxysedge.com, but please consider supporting the great work editor Mike Resnick does by purchasing a paperback or ebook copy (links at that address).


Into the Dungeon

Recently, I embarked upon my first Dungeons & Dragons campaign, along with my wife and three good friends. I was arrogant/foolish enough to put up my hand for the role of Dungeon Master, which I’ve found to be both extremely labour-intensive and extremely rewarding. Because I am not one to do things by halves, I’ve been creating a homebrew world for the players’ characters (PCs) to move within, although I’m sticking as closely as possible to the 5e rules, and basic (Player’s Handbook, Dungeon Master’s Guide & Monster Manual) races, classes and monsters.

I don’t consider myself a spontaneously imaginative person. I generally describe my creating process as picking up my mind and thrusting it at a question I want to answer or a person/place/situation I want to invent. Because of this, the highly improvisational nature of D&D doesn’t come naturally to me. I feel quite at home while doing hours of world building, when I can work at my own (slow) creative pace, but when I’m actually sitting at the head of the gaming table, I am far from my comfort zone. The role of a good Dungeon Master is to facilitate a story that the players create, which means coming up with non-player characters (NPCs) and locations on the fly and responding to the in-game questions, actions and motivations of the PCs. It’s not something that comes naturally to a person who likes to have everything in life thoroughly scripted-out in my head before I encounter it!

At this point in the campaign, the PCs are only at level two and are thus very squishy. This means that I have an excuse to script things out a little more than would usually be appropriate for a campaign. Right now, I need to make sure that I don’t accidentally kill the entire party with an overpowered random encounter, so a lot of the play has been introducing the characters to the campaign via a limited chunk of the universe. Centring things on one small town has allowed me to create NPCs ahead of time, so that the improvising was at least guided a little by point-form character traits.

Soon, though, the adventurers will be strong enough to venture forth into the greater world, and this will prove the real challenge for my nascent improvisational abilities. I’m hoping that I can continue to overcome my insecurities about acting and storytelling, because I think it’ll be a great learning experience, as well as a super-fun social experience, if I do.

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